Tagged: pokemon go

Pokémon GO Plus Review and First Impressions

As we are celebrating Nintendo Switch Eve, I’ve got my lawnchairs at the ready (if needed), not one but two mobile chargers, a warm coat, a scarf, and the latest and greatest to my queue survival pack: a Pokémon GO Plus.

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The Pokemon GO Plus package: wrist strap, and the Pokemon GO Plus device. Not pictures: Quick start instructions.

I tried my absolute darndest to avoid spending my REAL monies on Pokémon GO, but I couldn’t help myself. The way I justified it was that I don’t have a gym membership. I just found out gym memberships can cost anywhere from $25 a month to more than $60 a month. Not that I am knocking that – I think it’s great to invest in health and fitness… And to me, that’s what I paid into when I pulled the Amazon Canada trigger on a Pokemon Go Plus on a Saturday night after midnight. (Because if anyone knows how to party, it’s me.)

So how the heck does the Pokémon Go Plus thing work?

To actually use the device, you’ll need the following:

  • Pokemon GO app installed on your phone
  • Enabled Bluetooth
  • Pokemon GO Plus device (obviously)

While I am not entirely sure if you need to pair the device to your phone in your Bluetooth settings beforehand, you can definitely spot the device in your Pokemon GO app settings:

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Pokemon Go settings screen for the Pokemon GO Plus

Once you see a Pokemon GO Plus device under ‘Available Devices’, you’re ready to connect it using the Pokemon GO Plus icon in the upper right hand side.

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Ensuring your Pokemon GO Plus device is connected.

Note: If you accidentally connected your Pokemon GO Plus device, you can always disconnect it by tapping the icon again. It will be greyed out again.

Once the device is connected,  you will be along your merry way. Unlike your usual routine, you won’t need to have the app open – you don’t even need your phone to be unlocked! Just go for a walk, and the device will buzz/vibrate with a different coloured light, depending on whether it’s a PokeStop, or a Pokemon:

  • Flashing green: Pokemon
  • Flashing blue: PokeStop
  • Flashing once red: Pokemon GO does not have reception
  • Rainbow with long pulsing: Success with catching/getting items
  • Long red after pressing on flashing blue: Pokestop too far
  • Long white after pressing on flashing blue: Your bag is full
  • Short red after pressing on flashing green: Pokemon fled

Once an action is confirmed, your mobile device will get a notification


The battery for the device reportedly lasts about a month with daily use and uses Cr2032 type batteries.

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How do you use it and what benefits are there?

If you are a transit commuter, you’ll know that catching Pokemon may be a part of your daily routine. I commute with a car, and here if you are caught with you phone while driving, you will have a $500+ ticket slapped on you. Not worth it.

I’m the type of Pokemon GO player that actually has to make the effort to go for walks on my lunch break from work. (But with that said, I love that it does force me off the computer and get some fresh air.)

All you need to do is press a button when the device flashes green (for Pokemon) or blue (for PokeStops) and the whole “gameplay” (if you want to call it that) is automated.

With that said, the chances of catching a Pokemon are about 30% and it will only catch Pokemon that you have already caught.

Experience wise, you will receive 25 XP for Pokemon that have fled, 150 XP (100 base XP for a successful catch and 50 bonus XP for a first throw). You will also receive 3 candy, and 100 stardust.

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Wrist strap option beside the back of the Pokemon GO Plus.

I just carry my Pokemon GO Plus device on its own. I may or may not pay for it in the future, but the strap is so unattractive and cheap that I would rather clip it to my sweater when I am not using it. It’s also inconvenient to require a screwdriver to attach the device to the strap. Design-wise, it would be easier to have slots to feed the strap through.

So, is the Pokemon GO Plus worth it? What’s the verdict?

If you are looking for something to help you play the game without being attached to your phone, I think it’s worth it. I find that my daily walks at work have allowed me to walk faster and maintain my heart rate because I am not tied to constantly checking my phone. All the Pokemon I catch are the icing on top of the cake, and the device really shines in keeping my bag well-stocked.

If you’re expecting to come out on top, or use it as a replacement for playing, this device won’t do it. If you’re looking to keep your bags full, maintain your pace and speed when going on your “PokeWalks”, enjoy the 30% of Pokemon that you get without even trying, the Pokemon Go Plus does the trick.

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Official Niantic Pokemon GO Support pages: support.pokemongo.nianticlabs.com

Photos: Taken by me with a NikonD700 and Nikon 35mm f/1.8 and makeshift light box

Pokémon GO: Party Hat Pikachu Inspired Nail Art

Who else here has spent money on Pokémon GO?
*crickets*

Well, in either case – full confession: I have spent REAL money on Pokémon GO in the last week. I finally got my hands on a Pokemon Go Plus. I’ve been using it this week and I’ve been really (yes, really) enjoying it. I’ll be posting my review and first impressions tomorrow but I figured to celebrate, of course I had to do some Pokémon GO inspired nail art…

Pokémon GO is nominated for the Best VR/AR game at the Game Developers Choice Awards 2017. This week we also saw Pokémon Day on February 27th, which marks the anniversary of the original Japanese release of Pokémon Red/Green.

As an ode to Pokémon Day, Pokémon GO has released a bunch of Pikachus wearing party hats into the wild until March 6th.

I’ve attempted to re-create the party animal on my nails… Ironically with a bunch of Poké Balls flying at him. It took me approximately two and a half episodes of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, which is about an hour in normal people time.

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Ready to get this hawt look?

You might want to queue up your list on Netflix! Here’s how I created my Party Hat Pikachu nail art:

  1. Apply base coat.
  2. Apply a thin layer of light blue, or periwinkle nail paint. Repeat.
  3. Let dry.
  4. Using a white polish, carefully apply 1-3 “ball shapes” to the thumb, index, ring and pinky nail. Ensure that at least one half is opaque and has clean edges.
  5. Using a yellow polish, create a ‘half moon’ shape on the tip, and carefully paint long ear shapes.
  6. Using a fine nail art brush, paint red polish to the “worse” half of the white ball shapes. The shape of the Poke Balls should start to form.
  7. Use a fine point dotting tool to apply white polish to the centre of the Poke Ball.
  8. Use a fine nail art brush to carefully outline, and define the centre shapes of the Poke Balls. This step requires the most patience and a little goes a long way. Do not have too much polish to your brush as this will create uneven linework.
  9. Use a medium point dotting tool with black polish to create Pikachu’s eyes. Feel free to use an image for reference.
  10. Use a medium point dotting tool with red polish to create Pikachu’s blush dots.
  11. To bring Pikachu to life, use a fine point dotting tool with white polish to add eye catch lights to the black dots. (Doesn’t it make a difference?)
  12. Add a small nose by adding the slightest fleck of black paint with a fine nail art brush.
  13. Use a fine nail art brush with a pastel purple to create a triangle shape for Pikachu’s party hat.
  14. Use a medium point dotting tool with pastel turquoise/blue to create the base decor of the party hat, and top of party hat. Again, feel free to use an image for reference.
  15. Use a fine nail art brush to add some pastel pink strokes to the triangle party hat shape for more details.
  16. Use a fine nail art brush with white lacquer to slightly outline the party hat. It’s meant to make the hat pop, not define, so do not worry about the lines being perfectly opaque.
  17. Use a fine nail art brush with black lacquer to outline Pikachu’s head, and lightly outline the party hat. The party hat should look softer than the outlined, defined Pikachu head. Add Pikachu’s ear tips with the same black paint and brush, using a slight angle to separate from the rest of the yellow ear.
  18. Optional: Use a medium point dotting tool to create dots around the Poke Balls, and then use a fine point dotting tool around the medium dots. This is a filler technique and not required.
  19. Let dry and use a healthy amount of a fast dry top coat to seal off your work, and give it a glossy finish. You’re done!  (Was it worth it?)

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Products used:

  • Dotting tool with medium and fine points
  • Fine nail art brush from Daiso
  • Nails Inc. London – Hyde Park Basecoat
  • Barry M Gelly Hi Shine Nail Paint – Blueberry
  • OPI – Pine Snow
  • OPI – Black Onyx
  • Essie – Where’s My Chauffer
  • Pure Ice – Jail Bait
  • Sally Hansen Xtreme Wear – Coral Reef
  • Color Club – Almost Famous
  • Joe Fresh – Cherry
  • Seche Vite Top Coat

Stay tuned for my review and first impressions of the Pokemon Go Plus tomorrow!

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Taken from the official Pokemon Go website. My reference image.


Official Pokemon GO website: www.pokemongo.com/en-us
More details on the Pokemon Day event: www.pokemon.com/us/pokemon-news/pikachu-parties-in-pokemon-go

Photos: Taken by me with a NikonD700 and Nikon 35mm f/1.8 and makeshift light box